Amateur animator and filmmaker. Member of Toonwerks animation group (as th1rt3en). Film buff.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from omahdon  35,249 notes
Re: your "rule about naked people" -- How about people who take nude photos of themselves not be stupid and use storage devices that can be hacked, like cloud storage (or take any risks close to that)? Just HOW much personal responsibility does your generation need to shed before you get it through your thick skulls that it only costs $20 for a decent external hard drive these days? :|
Anonymous

fishingboatproceeds:

"The lock on your diary wasn’t very good, so it’s your fault I read your diary."

Reblogged from omahdon  10,253 notes

In the post-World War II era, the Klan experienced a huge resurgence. Its membership was skyrocketing, and its political influence was increasing, so Kennedy went undercover to infiltrate the group. By regularly attending meetings, he became privy to the organization’s secrets. But when he took the information to local authorities, they had little interest in using it. The Klan had become so powerful and intimidating that police were hesitant to build a case against them.

Struggling to make use of his findings, Kennedy approached the writers of the Superman radio serial. It was perfect timing. With the war over and the Nazis no longer a threat, the producers were looking for a new villain for Superman to fight. The KKK was a great fit for the role.

In a 16-episode series titled “Clan of the Fiery Cross,” the writers pitted the Man of Steel against the men in white hoods. As the storyline progressed, the shows exposed many of the KKK’s most guarded secrets. By revealing everything from code words to rituals, the program completely stripped the Klan of its mystique. Within two weeks of the broadcast, KKK recruitment was down to zero. And by 1948, people were showing up to Klan rallies just to mock them.

By

How Superman Defeated the Ku Klux Klan | Mental Floss (via sarkos)

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I ain’t the world’s best writer nor the world’s best speller
But when I believe in something I’m the loudest yeller

“Stetson Kennedy,” Woody Guthrie

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If Woody Guthrie wrote a song about your merits, you freaking HAD them.

(via delcat)

Stetson Kennedy: American Badass.

(via underscorex)